Pug Diabetes?
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    JazmineMay's Avatar
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    Thumbs down Pug Diabetes?

    Hello all.

    I was wondering if anyone elses pug/pugs have/had diabetes? If so, what are the symptoms for it or what do I need to look out for?

    I've been reading online about it and the subject scares me, Jazmine has almost all of the "said symptoms".

    If anyone out there has any other information, on this and what I need to do, please let us know.

    Worried parents here

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    Diabetes is very manageable so try not to worry.

    The symptoms that I saw in my Velvet (she was almost 7 when diagnosed) was that she was drinking excessive amounts of water and going to pee every few minutes. When the vet told me what it was, I cried because I didn't really know anything about diabetes.

    That was 16 months ago and after some adjustments in insulin, Velvet is doing just fine. We had to make several changes in the way we do things here but it really hasn't been any more work than before. I had to start feeding two times a day instead of one and keep them on a schedule which is hard with the way I work but is manageable.

    Velvet did go blind 2-3 weeks after being diagnosed due to cataracts. You would never know she was blind to watch her though.

    Good luck with Jazmine.
    Chris - Mom to Velvet, Bo and Ginny Jin
    And missing my precious girls Jade and Sissy who waits at the bridge for me.


    The gift which I am sending you is called a dog, and is in fact the most precious and valuable possession of mankind. - Theodorus Gaza

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    lihuesue's Avatar
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    Stop worrying until you have something to worry about. Get her to the vet and checked out.

    My Zeke ended up being diabetic, he was 1/2 rat terrier 1/2 doxie. His was from the steroids from having an immune problem. He was very hard to regulate. From when he 1st got sick with his immune problem, he lived for another year before we had him PTS. (one of the hardest decisions) As long as he had a good quality of life and wasn't in pain, we did everything we could for him. His organs were starting to shut down from being fried from the steroids. He also went blind about 17 weeks after being told he is diabetes... and it didn't stop him one bit. Around the house he was fine... on walks he learned when I said "up" there was a curb, down same thing... and he knew his left from his right too.

    Maybe your Jazmine just has a UTI, don't stress yourself, get your furbaby to the vet for some tests.

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    Prugirl is offline New to the Village
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    My 9 year old female was diagnosed a few months ago. She is now taking 9cc twice a day and seems to be doing fine. Has anybody had experience with self-checking the blood. We haven't done it yet, just taking her to the vet but it is getting expensive so we want to do it ourself. Any help will be appreciated.

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    shaynapug's Avatar
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    If you've read and are worried, I'd take her in for blood work. I did that with Solo....He is drinking more and has lost weight! They also looked at his urine...he does have an infection...but sugar looked good....So no more testing needs to be done.

    If it is diabetes and you catch it early enough, it's not that hard to manage! The needles are really small and thin....I hate needles but was able to help my friend when she couldn't be home to give it.
    Diane
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    http://www.midmichiganpugclub.com
    Chairperson of PDCA Rescue Committee

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prugirl View Post
    My 9 year old female was diagnosed a few months ago. She is now taking 9cc twice a day and seems to be doing fine. Has anybody had experience with self-checking the blood. We haven't done it yet, just taking her to the vet but it is getting expensive so we want to do it ourself. Any help will be appreciated.
    That seems odd. Normally vets want to establish a blood glucose curve over about 24 hours and then maybe every 4 - 6 weeks or so until they have stabilised - how often is your vet asking for blood glucose tests?
    You can normally tell by behaviour and breath smell/urine smell if they need more insulin. I guess if your vet wants to chart her BGL more closely you could talk with them about your buying a human BGL monitor (readily available) and using it, although I don't have any knowledge of anyone actually doing this.

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    lihuesue's Avatar
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    I agree with Puggers, it's odd and vets normally want to get a blood glucose curve. Which means your pugger would have to stay overnight at the vet and they would take a sample of blood every so often to find the highs and lows, after eating, etc.

    Since my vet could not get my Zeke figured out... we did the testing ourselves and found the dose that was correct for him. It takes a lot of time and patience. We used a human blood glucose testing machine. I made a chart up on my computer to fill in with the date and hour when tested and a column for after feeding and when his got his vetsulin and how much. We were able to get the sample from the inside of his ear. You only need a small amount to get the glucose level. We also used the human test strips to check his urine.

    My vet was really impressed on who much detail was there on our chart. We discussed it and came up with the proper amount of vetsulin.

    We also had problems giving him his shots. We found a device called an AutoInject2 that worked really well. You put the needle inside this device, you set the depth of the needle and all we needed to do was pull up some skin (changed areas all of the time) and press this device again that and hit the button, it was all over in what seemed to be a second, the vetsulin was delivered under his skin. This device is used for human diabetic, but also worked well for our Zeke.

    You really need to watch her diet and really read things before you give them to her. Zeke started liking baby carrots as a treat.

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    Prugirl is offline New to the Village
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    Millie has had 4 glucose curves done at the vet. I am currently giving her 9cc, per the vet, but I want to check it at least once a week. We are going to try to get it from the carpal pad in the am. She is on low fat, diabetic food, so her weight is currently good. I didn't try the ear because I could not see a vein. Any other suggestions.

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    lihuesue's Avatar
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    You don't need a vein. All you need is a small drop of blood (just enough to cover the end of the test strip) and the inside ear flaps are supposed to be a good place.

    You will get different readings depending on how long ago she had a meal, snack, etc. That is what the "Curve" is about, being tested before eating breakfast, after breakfast, mid-day, etc. so you can get an idea of her highs and lows and as long as you can keep her in a safe range, all is good. The level is always a bit high after a meal.

    My vet only wanted us to give Zeke one shot per day... after speaking with her and showing her the chart, I asked what if I can give him two shots per day (lower dosage) at maybe 10-12 hours apart. Even though the vetsulin is long acting, after about 8 hours it decreases in their system.

    I'm just saying what worked for Zeke, always talk to your vet to get a professional opinion.

    I mentioned the urine test strips too. Those will let you know by color how much is being dumped in her urine and those are easier to do, but not as accurate.

    Oh, almost forgot... keep a bottle of Karo syrup in your cabinet. If she hits a low, rub some on her gums to bring her level back up. You can also tell a lot from the color of her gums. Pink is good... blue/purple isn't.

    It may sound like a lot of scary things... but once she's regulated which it sounds like she is, it does get easier.

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