Adopting A Pug!!!
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
Like Tree3Likes
  • 1 Post By Nina_W
  • 2 Post By Nina_W

Thread: Adopting A Pug!!!

  1. #1
    jas_prudente is offline New to the Village
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Locust Grove, Georgia
    Posts
    3

    Default Adopting A Pug!!!

    Hi everyone! I am expecting on October 7th ;) and will be getting my baby around November 18th. Although this may seem kinda far I couldn't be more happy to be getting him.I've been doing so much research on how to clean their eyes, wrinkles, and nose. I have also been looking up anything and everything I need to know about them. I am going to start getting things ready for our baby. Are their any recommendations on what I should get? I am looking into a Puppia harness. What size do y'all think would be good for a puppy? Also what would y'all recommend for house training/crate training him. What size crate would you recommend? What food would be best for him? Any advice would be great. Thank y'all so much in advance!

  2. #2
    Nina_W's Avatar
    Nina_W is offline Village Story Teller
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Posts
    10,609

    Default

    Congratulations on the puppy! It would be good to ask the breeder about what she feeds, and to feed that for the first bit. Beyond that I'd recommend looking into raw, or a quality wet diet - generally Iams, Hills, Royal Canin and the like are fairly awful. Orijen, Earthborn, Acana all make good meals. Lots of good local options usually as well, we have Montego that has some fairly nice options. I feed raw myself, if you're interested I'm happy to talk about it more.

    Here's a good website to dig around in:
    Dog Food Reviews and Ratings | Dog Food Advisor

    Have you found a vet you like yet? That would be a good next thing to sort out.

    Puggies can vary a lot in size (especially if they're not from a show breeder, not sure of your situation), so as for harness/crate and the like I can't help much there yet. Getting an adult sized crate then blocking off the internal space to the right size seems the most cost effective option.
    Puppia are a nice brand - soft :) Many puggies can escape them, but that's true of a lot of harnesses, so generally, you're better off not giving them a reason to escape.

    Another thing to look at would be a nice puppy school - a place that's big on socialisation, working with positive training methods. Maybe someplace that uses clickers?
    Reading a bit about the importance of socialisation is a good idea anyway:
    Paw In Hand Dog Training: "Puppy Socialization"
    http://www.dogstardaily.com/blogs/dr...puppies-people

    As for housetraining... well, paitience and consistency, with big rewards for doing the right thing does the job. I'm sure you know that rubbing their noses in it is pretty much useless (and unsanity, poor puppy could get an infection). Same with scolding, what the doggy learns is only that you don't want to see their 'business', not where and when to do their 'business'. We found a schedule to be useful, I took her to her potty spot (a litter box, actually) after naps, after playtime, before mealtimes, after mealtimes, and otherwise at a set interval (I think I started at an hourly interval, when she was 8 weeks old). We extended the interval as she got older and better at controlling her bladder. Soon enough she would take herself to her potty spot (she didn't always make it at first, shame, little nut). She was pretty much done by 5/6 months old, but some take much longer, up to a year, to master house training.

    Chewy toys are also good, bully sticks, tracheas, hooves and antlers are all good options. They are busy little things, pug puppies, and a puppy with a full mouth is not currently gnawing on your furniture :P

    OOOH! Charge your camera batteries :P

    Have you thought of names yet?
    Lu Ci and Ri Ki likes this.

  3. #3
    Lu Ci and Ri Ki's Avatar
    Lu Ci and Ri Ki is online now Village Ya-Ya
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    28,808

    Default

    Hello and to PugVillage. Glad you have joined us. on your new Puggie puppy. Nina has given you great advice. Yes, please, lots of photos of the homecoming.
    We never touch people so lightly that we don't leave a trace.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    PugVillage.com
    Advertisements

  5. #4
    Tinker's mom's Avatar
    Tinker's mom is offline Village Royalty
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Manteo,North Carolina,USA
    Posts
    20,154

    Default

    Hello & to the village! How exciting!! You've already been given great advice, glad to have you here! Can't wait for baby pics!
    Jackie,Mom to Robbie & Stacy my human children and Tinker my furkid.

  6. #5
    jas_prudente is offline New to the Village
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Locust Grove, Georgia
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thank you so much for all the advice! I have been considering to train my puppy with a litter box. Is this something you recommend and do you still allow your dog to use it? Also what kind litter box do you recommend? I have seen the ones with the pee pads, one where there is fake grass, or ones that use dog litter. You mentioned something about feeding raw. What is this exactly?

  7. #6
    jas_prudente is offline New to the Village
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Locust Grove, Georgia
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nina_W View Post
    Congratulations on the puppy! It would be good to ask the breeder about what she feeds, and to feed that for the first bit. Beyond that I'd recommend looking into raw, or a quality wet diet - generally Iams, Hills, Royal Canin and the like are fairly awful. Orijen, Earthborn, Acana all make good meals. Lots of good local options usually as well, we have Montego that has some fairly nice options. I feed raw myself, if you're interested I'm happy to talk about it more.

    Here's a good website to dig around in:
    Dog Food Reviews and Ratings | Dog Food Advisor

    Have you found a vet you like yet? That would be a good next thing to sort out.

    Puggies can vary a lot in size (especially if they're not from a show breeder, not sure of your situation), so as for harness/crate and the like I can't help much there yet. Getting an adult sized crate then blocking off the internal space to the right size seems the most cost effective option.
    Puppia are a nice brand - soft :) Many puggies can escape them, but that's true of a lot of harnesses, so generally, you're better off not giving them a reason to escape.

    Another thing to look at would be a nice puppy school - a place that's big on socialisation, working with positive training methods. Maybe someplace that uses clickers?
    Reading a bit about the importance of socialisation is a good idea anyway:
    Paw In Hand Dog Training: "Puppy Socialization"
    http://www.dogstardaily.com/blogs/dr...puppies-people

    As for housetraining... well, paitience and consistency, with big rewards for doing the right thing does the job. I'm sure you know that rubbing their noses in it is pretty much useless (and unsanity, poor puppy could get an infection). Same with scolding, what the doggy learns is only that you don't want to see their 'business', not where and when to do their 'business'. We found a schedule to be useful, I took her to her potty spot (a litter box, actually) after naps, after playtime, before mealtimes, after mealtimes, and otherwise at a set interval (I think I started at an hourly interval, when she was 8 weeks old). We extended the interval as she got older and better at controlling her bladder. Soon enough she would take herself to her potty spot (she didn't always make it at first, shame, little nut). She was pretty much done by 5/6 months old, but some take much longer, up to a year, to master house training.

    Chewy toys are also good, bully sticks, tracheas, hooves and antlers are all good options. They are busy little things, pug puppies, and a puppy with a full mouth is not currently gnawing on your furniture :P

    OOOH! Charge your camera batteries :P

    Have you thought of names yet?


    Thank you so much for all the advice! I have been considering to train my puppy with a litter box. Is this something you recommend and do you still allow your dog to use it? Also what kind litter box do you recommend? I have seen the ones with the pee pads, one where there is fake grass, or ones that use dog litter. You mentioned something about feeding raw. What is this exactly? And I have not thought about names yet, I do know I want a boy though.

  8. #7
    Nina_W's Avatar
    Nina_W is offline Village Story Teller
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Johannesburg
    Posts
    10,609

    Default

    Hi again :)

    Quote Originally Posted by jas_prudente View Post
    Thank you so much for all the advice! I have been considering to train my puppy with a litter box. Is this something you recommend and do you still allow your dog to use it? Also what kind litter box do you recommend? I have seen the ones with the pee pads, one where there is fake grass, or ones that use dog litter.
    We used the litter box at the time because we lived in an apartment. It has many advantages in that sort of situation, mostly around the puggy being able to decide when she needed to go and not having to rely on us to take her outside. It allows us to travel with her and never worry about her soiling the place we stay. Over all, it worked very well for us.

    We used the tray-and-dog-litter kind. It's easy to clean, the litter recycles, and with a diaper pail next to it into which we scooped 'deposits' it was fairly odourless. I have no experience with any other system, though the piddle place seems to get good reviews. Whatever you do, know that it will need scooping out twice daily (or more), that it takes up a bit of floor space (about the size of a large bath mat for a comfortable toiletting experience for a pug), and that it will need a proper scrubbing weekly. No one wants a dirty litter box around.

    Until we moved to our house, where there is a secure yard where she can go anytime she pleases, we had the litter box. That's roughly three years. Now we've packed it away, but we can take it out should we wish to travel or whatnot.

    She of course also learnt she could go outside. She has fairly strong preferences as to her weeing spots, and much prefers a patch of mondo grass to nearly anything else, though any taller, leafy plants seem to work. This is not unusual, many puggies take absolute ages to find the right spot. Lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by jas_prudente View Post
    You mentioned something about feeding raw. What is this exactly?
    Raw feeding means that in stead of feeding your dog cooked meat (such as you might find in kibble), you feed them raw meat. It has many benefits - their coat is shiny, thick, healthy and they shed a bit less (but pugs shed a lot, whatever you do, so don't imagine this is a cure to shedding). They tend to not have food related issues such as recurring ear infections or yeast problems. The portions are also fairly accurately measured, so you don't have as much of an obesity issue with a raw fed dog. They feel different to touch - a kibble fed dog, especially, has 'soft' muscles, while my raw fed beasties have hard, corded muscles. Raw fed dogs have no doggy odour. Just none. They do smell faintly of themselves, if you stick your nose right up into their fur, in the same way that if you sniffed your friend's arm you'd smell them too, but no doggy odour at all.

    Raw feeding does not mean you simply plonk a steak down in front of your dog, though. There are commercial products that sell raw like you would buy kibble or canned food, I'm sure a villager who lives near you could help with brands available in your area, but I think petco sells some raw meals nowadays. These prepared meals have a balanced set of nutrients that make sure your doggy gets everything they need.

    Then there are ways of doing it yourself, either you make a raw mixture (often called BARF - biologically appropriate raw food - an awful acronym if there ever was one). There are many, many recipes out there, but I would recommend getting a book if this interests you. This one is very good:
    Pet Cookbook | Recipes for Dogs and Cats
    This website is also very good:
    https://therawfeedingcommunity.com
    and here's a recipe:
    BARF-Diet ::: BARF Recipe

    Then, there's a style of raw feeding called 'Prey model raw'. In it, you feed your dog whole (skin and all) raw prey animals. Now, I believe you can immediately hear that this is literally impossible for general day to day use - you cannot easily source enough variety to make a proper prey model diet - maybe you can get whole chickens, whole rabbits, whole rats, maybe whole deer, but if you are like me, you can find one or two of those, occasionally. So what most prey model feeders do is assemble a kind of 'franken-prey'. They take a chicken head, some ox tripe, a deer heart, and so on, and feed all the bits of an animal in chunks.

    ... There are people on this forum who feed this way. I do not. I am both squeamish and cautious of my ability to manage this in a nutritionally balanced and complete way. Doesn't mean it might not be exactly the right option for you.

    However you feed your main meals, raw diets all contain raw, meaty bones. These are ribs, hips, shoulders - not weightbearing bones of large mammals, since those might hurt teeth, but pretty much anything else goes. Here's my Talos working on a pork shoulder - it's nice and big so she'll definitely not choke on it.

    Now, raw, meaty bones are a miracle. They help clean and scrape teeth to be beautiful and white, avoiding much of a kibble or canned fed dog's tooth problems. The long period of chewing helps the dog emotionally as well, chewing makes them calmer and happier, and keeps them contentedly busy for... well, hours on a bone day.

    Raw has downsides. It takes up quite a bit of freezer space. You need to treat it as you would all raw meat. You need to wash your hands with soap after handling it, and you need to clean your surfaces as if you handled raw meat. You can't freeze/defrost/freeze/defrost the same piece of meat, it will go off (and off meat makes dogs sick just like it makes us sick). It can be messy (though in the flat, we taught Talos to eat her bones on a mat that we could then just wash). If you ever feed raw, green tripe, a fantastic food for dogs, it can be really stinky (though kibbles and cans also smell).

    Hope this helps a bit?
    Lu Ci and Ri Ki and alix like this.

+ Reply to Thread

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts