Pediatric Neutering and Spaying
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Pediatric Neutering and Spaying

  1. #1
    Pugpillow's Avatar
    Pugpillow is offline Village Royalty
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Quinte West, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    7,504

    Default Pediatric Neutering and Spaying

    Because of some posts on another thread on an unrelated matter (a member's new pug was neutered at 12 weeks), I thought I'd bring up this subject separately. My first reaction was shock and the thought that it couldn't be a good thing. But I just did a bit of quick research and found nothing but positive comments about the concept. I'd like to hear a balanced discussion, so would appreciate if knowledgeable posters would weigh in the subject - pro and con. Thanks.
    "You cannot afford to subject your animals, or your children, to medical interventions that you do not understand. The belief system upon which the conventional medical model is founded is so faulty, so corrupt and so dangerous that you simply cannot afford to follow blindly." Catherine O’Driscoll http://www.whale.to/vaccine/driscoll1.html

    Hilary & the Pugpillow Gang: Rescues: Denver (10), Tina (7), Murdoch (5) and chihuahua puppy Maximus Spartacus. Always loving my angel-girl Mei-Ling (1994-2009), my cutie-patootie Kim-Soo (1995-2010), my precious Daisy-Bo (1998?-2006), my sweet boyfriend Jake (1997-2010), my little black beauty Betsy (1995-2010), my sweet old grumpy man Gooey (1996-2011), and my sweet gentleman Farnsworth (1998-2012) at the Bridge.

  2. #2
    Snifter's Avatar
    Snifter is offline Moderator/Village Merchant
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Essex, England
    Posts
    18,172

    Default

    Canine Sports Productions: Early Spay-Neuter Considerations for the Canine Athlete

    Here is an article discussing some of the down sides of early neutering.

    I would also be concerned about putting a pet through a fairly major surgical procedure (applies more to bitches than dogs, I suppose, but still requires GA for both) at a time when it is undergoing the stresses of adjusting to a new family and possibly going through fear periods.

    If the pup has just completed the vaccination course I would be far more concerned about classes, socialisation and training than an operation.


    Bella, mummy to Snifter and Toddy!

    http://avrilmunson.wordpress.com









  3. #3
    OzzyBear's Avatar
    OzzyBear is offline Village Mayor
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    St. Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    163

    Default

    I'd have to agree with snifter...They already don't know what's going on as it is when they go in for the surgery. And the fact that they are just getting used to your house might throw them for a loop being kept at the vet over night.

    Also when they are that young their immunities aren't very developed. I remember Oz had an infection at about 8 weeks old. The vet said it's common in puppies just ebcause their immunities just don't know what to do sometimes.
    The Oz Man


    "Life is what happens to you while you're busy making other plans" - John Lennon

  4. Remove Advertisements
    PugVillage.com
    Advertisements
     

  5. #4
    6 Beautiful Pugs's Avatar
    6 Beautiful Pugs is offline Village Caretaker of the Old & Broken
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Sun City, CA
    Posts
    12,252

    Default

    In our state, if you pull a puppy (or kitten) from a shelter they must be at least 8 weeks old and they must be spayed or neutered before they leave. So many pups are being spayed and neutered here as youn as 8 weeks old.

    My Marty was neutered at 4 months, he did very well from the surgery. The only difference I notice between him and our fosters who were neutered as adults is Marty is hung significantly "lighter" than they are. He is also of a lighter bone and musculature than the others, which may be the neuter or may be genetcs, who knows.

    Marty also developed Legg-Calve-Perthes disease before he was a year old, a genetic disease, but there seems to be some correlation between early neutering and the disease which always has nagged at my mind.

    Take care,
    Lisa
    In a gentle way, you can shake the world.

    - Mohandas Gandhi


  6. #5
    Pugpillow's Avatar
    Pugpillow is offline Village Royalty
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Quinte West, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    7,504

    Default

    Good point about the vaccination conflict. It's so important not to vaccinate within 3 weeks on either side of surgery and hard enough to get in 3 DHPP shots plus a rabies shot - all 3 weeks apart, within the prescribed period, without adding a 6 (3 week pre, 3 week post) week delay because of surgery. That one argument alone convinces me it's a bad idea. I do understand the shelter system conundrum, though, and if a concession of any kind is to be made, I'd err on the side of ensuring that the dog couldn't reproduce.
    "You cannot afford to subject your animals, or your children, to medical interventions that you do not understand. The belief system upon which the conventional medical model is founded is so faulty, so corrupt and so dangerous that you simply cannot afford to follow blindly." Catherine O’Driscoll http://www.whale.to/vaccine/driscoll1.html

    Hilary & the Pugpillow Gang: Rescues: Denver (10), Tina (7), Murdoch (5) and chihuahua puppy Maximus Spartacus. Always loving my angel-girl Mei-Ling (1994-2009), my cutie-patootie Kim-Soo (1995-2010), my precious Daisy-Bo (1998?-2006), my sweet boyfriend Jake (1997-2010), my little black beauty Betsy (1995-2010), my sweet old grumpy man Gooey (1996-2011), and my sweet gentleman Farnsworth (1998-2012) at the Bridge.

  7. #6
    pugaddiction's Avatar
    pugaddiction is offline Village Royalty
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Aldergrove, British Columbia, Canada
    Posts
    5,623

    Default

    We too here are spaying and neutering very early now when coming from a shelter. I have concerns about this but do understand the necessity of it. I did read an article about it and read that animals that are spayed and neutered early are growing taller because of something to do with the growth plates. I am worried that people are doing the right thing by rescuing these pets but down the road are going to have major health issues that they are not ready for or can afford and the animals are going to end up back in shelters and rescues. Just my thought.
    Pug Mom to Roxie
    Zoey (March 27, 2005 - February 23, 2015) and Eddie (October 2, 2010 - September 10, 2019) have moved on to the bridge

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts