Seizure Medication
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    Fla. Pugs's Avatar
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    Default Seizure Medication

    Could everyone please share what type of medication your pug is taking for seizures?
    Linda~ Bugsy Pug, Millie and Captain Jack our Schnauzers.


    Miyaghi~my pug angel, July 27, 2005
    Bubba our sweet pug boy, May 18, 2008
    Luke, May 8, 2012

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    Back in the day I had a collie mix who was very well controlled on phenobarbital. No side effects. My little Bug was on potassium Bromide, with some success, but not perfect.

    Take care,
    Lisa
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    Thanks Lisa! I'm hoping to hear from others also.
    Linda~ Bugsy Pug, Millie and Captain Jack our Schnauzers.


    Miyaghi~my pug angel, July 27, 2005
    Bubba our sweet pug boy, May 18, 2008
    Luke, May 8, 2012

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    jwelch is offline Village Puppy
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    Our guy has had seizures sin e he was 2. Is now 8. He has never been on meds. We work with a hollistic vet to keep them manageable.

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    Years ago I had one on pheno and we switched him to PB (potassium bromide). It really messed up his balance for some reason so we switched him back. More recently I had one that suffered from cluster seizures. He was on increasing doses of pheno and I always had syringes of valium on hand if the pheno didn't work to stop the seizures. He started going into rapid cluster seizures so my vet prescribed PB however he only got one dose before we made the painful decision to let him go as he was beginning to seize nonstop...
    Janelle and the puzzle: Cinder, Gus, Captain, Heidi, Cody, Stuart, Dimitri, Chase, Rocky, Katy, Oscar...and Willie-the pug/terrier. Forever missing Sorsha, Pugsley, Mei-Li, China Girl, Jake, Myles, Odie, Wilbur, Sherman, Dewey, Mickey, Boogie and Potter...my angels at the Bridge.
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    My late shepherd/lab mix Rascal was on phenobarb from the age of 6 until 16. He was very well-controlled, and had periodic blood testing to check levels and liver function. His liver did fail in the end, but it was very rapid and he'd had a good long run of health. He died in my arms at home, with the help of my vet (and my heart broke in a million tiny pieces).

    It's my understanding that with the correct levels, liver problems are fairly rare. If they should arise, bromide is used instead. I hope they are able to find a way to help Jack!

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    Squeezable Beasties is offline Village Mayor
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    Default Potassium Bromide (KBr), Levetiracetam (Keppra), Gaba, Prednisone & Rectal Diazepam

    SushiPug has never undergone advanced imagining, or taps.

    Short Answer: While it depends on the particular case, consider inquiring what your neurologist has to say about the routine daily use of Potassium Bromide (KBr), and/or Levetiracetam (Keppra), and rectal Diazepam gel syringes for hopefully never-to-occur break-through emergencies.

    HER-PUG-STORY (the details of which will hopefully help, more than confuse....):

    A dermatologist's Prednisone (type: glucocorticoid prodrug) shot given immediately following a skin allergen test may have been the first treatment that (accidentally) helped control SushiPug's full blown seizures. Months later, when they reoccurred, her GP put her on Diazepam (a benzodiazepine), as we wanted to start with the less risky KBr (a salt), and not Phenobarbital (or Pheno, a barbiturate), but her GP was unfamiliar with KBr, instead relying on Pheno.

    This brought us to her first neurologist, who agreed that KBr was the drug of first choice for her situation, and she remained on it for many years.

    During this period there were no observed episodes, and her routine blood-work showed no real detrimental effects. A high initial "loading dose" was used, which she tolerated fairly well, and then the dosage was adjusted down to a maintenance dose, all in compounded capsules. KBr is also relatively very inexpensive, especially in the liquid form. With the liquid, dose modification is simple, and comes at no additional monetary cost (minimum compounding fees, unused and now of no use dosage capsules). Of course, both the Pug in question, and their humans must all agree to the additional effort needed to consistently accurately administer a liquid, though it can be scrumptiously flavored, or so they say.

    Gabapentin (or Gaba, which is a GABA analogue) was added to her regime by her GP, for both neuropathic pain control, and as an anticonvulsant.

    Years latter, during the tail end of Chemo (for which she was on tapering doses of Prednisone), when she began to exhibit the new symptoms of tremors and shakes, we restarted Diazepam.

    Her second neurologist also added Levetiracetam (Keppra) to her regime. She had us stop the Gaba, cold-turkey, as she felt that it was "almost useless as a canine anticonvulsant", and could be contributing to SushiPug's long-term retching/vomiting problem.

    Her third neurologist felt that these new events were not seizures, but where pain related tremors. She had us gradually reduced and eliminate the long-term successful KBr (here is where the liquid becomes indispensable). She also had us eliminate the even longer-term (more than 10 years) Potassium Citrate (Urocit-K, prescribed as part of an anti-bladder crystal/stone regime), due to the possibility that these new symptoms could be related to either her developing such side effects from the long-term use of the KBr, and/or to an overabundance of Potassium itself (though her tests showed Potassium to be with-in normal ranges).

    Daily Diazepam was also gradually tapered down to zero, now to be used on an "as needed" basis, again.

    Gaba was reintroduced, but at a lower dosage, and on an "as needed" basis for shakes and tremor incidents.

    Presently, her routine daily anticonvulsant regime is Levetiracetam (3x/day). Gaba currently appears to be needed twice per day for the tremors and shakes. The daily Prednisone remains, as well.

    Diazepam is very occasionally used. Rectal Diazepam (first in suppositories, and now finally available as a faster acting gel administered with a syringe for far far far less than hundreds of dollars per shot it cost not that long ago) is kept in the fridge in case of the hopefully never to reoccur full-blown seizures that have not been seen since the start of the (no longer used) KBr, many years ago. The syringes are replaced every few month when they reach their short expiration dates, but we would much rather be "wasting" them, then having to use them!
    Last edited by Squeezable Beasties; 08-18-2012 at 03:27 PM. Reason: Added drug types, as OP requested.

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