Elongated soft palate
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
Like Tree4Likes

Thread: Elongated soft palate

  1. #1
    sally-uk is offline Village Puppy
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    UK Surrey
    Posts
    93

    Default Elongated soft palate

    Hi all
    Do any of you have any experience when it comes to this?
    Reg has passed out a few times and the vet has said he suspects elongated soft palate.
    We are in the uk and he said that he will probably need to be operated on. Reg is nearly 3. In good health apart from that. This is really worrying as I'm sure some of you will know.

    Any advice or experiences welcome.
    Thank you.
    Worried pug mum

  2. #2
    AmberB's Avatar
    AmberB is offline Village Admiral
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Niagara Falls, Canada
    Posts
    2,229

    Default

    So sorry to hear you and Reg are going through this. 8 ( I don't have any personal experience with pug palate issues but there are a bunch of members here who have. I am sure they will respond to your post and share their knowledge. Just wanted to say hello and that we are sending positive thoughts for a quick and complete recovery for Reg.

  3. #3
    AmyR's Avatar
    AmyR is offline Village Ninja Pug
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,871

    Default

    Hi,
    To answer the question about whether I have experienced this....in a word....yep! About a month ago :) many on here will have experienced it I think especially the soft palate surgery.
    Will has fainted 4 Times now and to cut a long story short, we were referred (by our vet) to a vet hospital in Chester. Will was seen by a specialist and referred to a neurologist and then a soft palate surgeon. He was put under GA to see what his palate was like. Basically they said his fainting was not due to his palate (our vet thought it was) and it is a vasovagal response where a nerve gets trapped. (please look up vasovagal episodes in dogs for a better explanation than mine!)
    Apparently this is harmless and will just be 'him'. Obviously we are keeping a very close eye on if /when he does it again to be certain. That's our story which hopefully encourages you that it MAY not be his palate even though pugs are prone to this issue.
    Another thing to think of is the questions they will ask:

    When does it happen usually?
    Is it on exertion?
    What is like afterwards?
    How long do the episodes last?

    Also, Will was referred to a cardiologist aswel. This was because in cases of fainting, the first worry is that there is something amiss with his heart. Even if the vet says this is not necessary (and you are insured!) I would really recommended asking for a referral to a cardiologist as it will put your mind at rest.
    Sorry - bit of a barrage of info for you but believe me I so know what you are going through and it's horrible. Hopefully this is of some help to you. Good luck and I hope you get it sorted to put your mind at rest
    sally-uk and cellophane like this.
    Amy
    ~ Will's mum and servant!
    And now mummy to puppy Charlie too! Who said pugs are addictive?! :)

  4. Remove Advertisements
    PugVillage.com
    Advertisements

  5. #4
    sally-uk is offline Village Puppy
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    UK Surrey
    Posts
    93

    Default

    Thank you Amber. Really frightening!
    I just hope it's sorted out soon.

    Hi Amy. Thank you for replying. I'd be really keen to hear more about your experience.

    Just to give you a bit of info. With reg, his breathing isn't really laboured. He does snore, but when he is awake he isn't struggling for breath. His 'episodes' have happened a handful of times. Always when another dog is involved. He would play with the dog, then if the dog gets too much or reg decided he's had enough and the other dog won't leave him, he tries to bark, struggles to breathe, sounds like he is barking, then conks out. It lasts seconds, his tongue and gums are grey, then he comes to. Again, this takes seconds and he is a little out of it then it's like nothing has happened.
    Today, there was no dog involved. He went to the toilet, barked at an aeroplane, came to sit next to me and then it happened.
    I took him to the vet and he has suggested that I try to monitor his heart beat. When he is rested and if it happens again. He also said that he will not perform the surgery if it is the elongated soft palate and he will suggest someone. He said it will cost thousands? I'm not sure if the insurance will cover it. Is it a preexisting condition that I didn't know about? So confusing.
    I will definitely look up the condition that Will has. It has given me some hope.
    These piglets are such a worry. He's like my baby.

  6. #5
    sally-uk is offline Village Puppy
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    UK Surrey
    Posts
    93

    Default

    I just read your post Amy about the vasovagal nerve. This could be it. It is only in times of stress. And this morning when there wasn't a trigger... He looked as if he was straining to poo. He pooed. He barked. Then it happened. Wow!
    Can I ask, what was the outcome with will? What are his triggers?

  7. #6
    AmyR's Avatar
    AmyR is offline Village Ninja Pug
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,871

    Default

    We found with Will, it was happening just after he woke up. He's a puppy so he's crated and if for example he was asleep and we walked in, he'd get up really excited. We would let him out his cage straight away and he would run round super excited then it would happen. I try now to leave him in the cage to wake up before he comes out. Even if he does moan! Whether this helps, I don't know but he hasn't done it for a few weeks.
    'normal vet's don't tend to do soft palate surgery apparently. It's always a hospital.
    The outcome for Will was basically that the 3 specialists he saw agreed about the diagnosis but without an MRI, it's not absolutely concrete. As we've had his heart scanned, a neurologist has seen him and they checked the length of his palate they suggested an MRI would be putting him under a lot of stress unnecessarily.
    I basically said to them that I don't care if it's something we just deal with but I need to know that it's not harmful to him and that there's no danger of him not waking up! They were happy to confirm this so we left the hospital satisfied that he wasn't in danger (I grilled the poor vet we saw there!!)

    Who are you insured with? We are with Tesco and they paid out no problems. They put the claim under 'investigations for syncope (fainting)'. Not saying this will be the same for whoever you are with but I really can't see it being a preexisting condition as it wasn't an issue before.

    I would really suggest you ask to see a cardiologist aswel. I hope to goodness it's nothing serious for Reg but I cannot tell u the relief on hearing from Wills cardiologist that she didn't find anything to concern her on his ECG.
    Someone else on here said she (the human!) has vasovagal episodes, maybe she will give u her thoughts.

    I don't want to bombard you but if I can help, let me know! Give Reg a cuddle for us!! :)
    Amy
    ~ Will's mum and servant!
    And now mummy to puppy Charlie too! Who said pugs are addictive?! :)

  8. #7
    Loconn55's Avatar
    Loconn55 is offline Village Royalty
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Far Northern California
    Posts
    5,133

    Default

    Hmm... could be the palate, but usually you'd hear breathing problems with exercise that are pretty evident. Does he have any reverse sneezing (sort of gagging episodes when he's trying to get his breath)? Are his nostrils very small? Does he get out of breath with exercise or play, and prop his head or pant to get more air (beyond the normal-style dog panting)? My Chainsaw, who's gone through six airway surgeries and still has some issues, gets extremely excited just hearing the fridge open, and when he's playing or excited, you can hear his breathing getting louder and louder over a few minutes, and he's never fainted.

    I'd definitely take him for evaluation by a specialist who is familiar with brachycephalic breeds before I scheduled any surgery. If the airway and nostrils are OK, they'd probably refer you for cardiology and/or neuro consult.

    Good luck! This could be an airway problem, though it sounds a little odd. If it turns out he needs surgery, it's definitely best to go to a specialist who does a lot of these. Most dogs do fine with it, and the laser option gives better results in general, with less postop swelling. But it might just be vasovagal, as the other Villagers have suggested, or something else that doesn't require surgery. Keep us posted.
    CSollers likes this.
    See Lisa's (6 Beautiful Pugs) 'wishlist' for her grumble at the Rusty Pug Retirement Ranch and help them out at:http://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wi...ref=cm_sw_su_w

  9. #8
    sally-uk is offline Village Puppy
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    UK Surrey
    Posts
    93

    Default

    Thank you all!!
    He doesn't get breathless with exercise. He can pugtona with our other pug marvin and be absolutely fine.
    He doesn't really pant, unless very hot and bothered which is very rare as we are careful.
    Would this suggest soft palate or not? It's all so new to me I'm praying its vasovagal really. I'm going to speak to the vet tomorrow and see if he will refer me. I'd rather not put him under anaesthetic if it may not be the elongated soft palate.
    It's so nice to be able to hear from you fellow pug people. This forum is invaluable.

  10. #9
    AmyR's Avatar
    AmyR is offline Village Ninja Pug
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4,871

    Default

    Loconn55 is an expert with soft palate issues but imo it doesn't sound like it is his palate as his breathing is not rough (think this is what she said). Also, apparently if the heart is the problem exercise is usually a problem for the dog but not always.
    When they looked at Wills palate they put him under what they said was a light G A then there was apparently an anaesthetist on standby incase they went ahead with the surgery. I don't kno what is a light GA but I liked the word light! Maybe this would be an option for you.
    Please keep us posted on how Reg gets on! Hope it's nothing serious :) and don't be afraid to be an interfering, pestering, neurotic mother with the Vets!! I know I certainly was!!
    Amy
    ~ Will's mum and servant!
    And now mummy to puppy Charlie too! Who said pugs are addictive?! :)

  11. #10
    Loconn55's Avatar
    Loconn55 is offline Village Royalty
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Far Northern California
    Posts
    5,133

    Default

    Yeah, Sally, that kind of vigorous exercise without rough breathing is not typical of the usual dog with ESP -- as far as I know, they always have loud breathing and sometimes (often?) other problems / behaviors that indicate airway blockage.

    Other folks with experience might chime in with some atypical presentations (maybe he's got sonme kind of wiggle in his throat architecture that causes sudden blockage from a flapping everted saccule or something?), but they usually don't even HAVE everted saccules without at least a regular history of struggling to breathe.

    To this unprofessional pug person, it sounds like something else is going on here; I'd have him tested for the vasovagal problem or neuro stuff, if that's negative.

    If you do have him checked for palate problems, they usually do a light anesthetic to put a scope down the throat; as far as I know, not as intrusive as the general anesthetic they'd use for a surgery. Whatever you do, find a specialist who has experience with brachycephalic dogs, and if it IS the palate, consider having the nostrils done first; sometimes nostril enlargement will open up enough air flow enough to avoid the palate trim surgery, even in some dogs with some throat issues, if the dog is young enough (< 8 or 9 months) and the palate isn't too bad.

    Good luck. It's so scary when they're sick, but they don't seem to be as upset as we are about it most of the time. Keep us posted.
    CSollers likes this.
    See Lisa's (6 Beautiful Pugs) 'wishlist' for her grumble at the Rusty Pug Retirement Ranch and help them out at:http://www.amazon.com/gp/registry/wi...ref=cm_sw_su_w

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts