Advice on getting my first pug puppy :)
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Thread: Advice on getting my first pug puppy :)

  1. #1
    NicolaJ is offline Village Puppy
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    Default Advice on getting my first pug puppy :)

    Hey guys!

    I'm new here so hope I am doing this right lol!
    So after two years of wanting a pug I have found a breeder and will be due to get my first pug in around 6 months time, I am sooo excited and impatient after already waiting so long!
    I have done two years of research and I am positive this is the perfect dog for me :) any general advice for when I bring my puppy home and I am also getting pick of the litter so what should I look for when choosing my puppy?
    I wanted to get a boy but are there really any differences between male and female pugs?
    I'm going go start getting what I need in the next few months what size crate would people recommend?
    Thanks guys! One excited soon to be pug owner :)
    Loydafr likes this.

  2. #2
    Nina_W's Avatar
    Nina_W is offline Village Story Teller
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    What should you look for? The one that speaks to you. You've done your research, found a breeder you like... odd are all of them will be wonderful, perfect little puggies. If you're planning on showing, let the breeder guide you, they'll know which ones are show prospects and which are not. It will also help if you go to a few pug shows and know the pug standard. The breeder also typically knows the puppies quite well, if you want a more laid back one they can advise you, likewise with more spunk. All of this, and any first impressions of the puppy, may well change over time as they grow up.

    There are 'puppy tests' that you can do too, if you want to, here's an example:
    Volhard Dog Training and Nutrition: Behavior and Training: Behavior
    I really don't think much of the dominance tests, most contemporary behaviourists also find this to be dubious, but it will help you get some idea of what the pup is like, and how headstrong they are. Also, the advice is a bit dubious also. A puppy with lots of 1s and 2s may be hard to handle, but they may also be just the thing for busy kids, for people with competition/obedience/show aspirations. And ALL dogs can be a bite risk, ALL dogs will need training. The most dangerous dog is a scared, cornered dog. Again, though, one test on one day, with a stranger, tells you very, very little about how the puppy is or will be. Some people swear by these tests, though, so I thought I'd share them :)

    Boys tend to be more laid back, girls have a bit more of a diva attitude. There's an exception for every rule, though. Girls are smaller, potty training can be different if your boy lifts his leg at a young age, and an intact girl will have seasons during which time you will have to keep her safely on lead and under supervision. There's also the thought that boy dogs bond more easily with women, girl dogs with men, but in my personal experience this has not been true.

    What size are the parents? That will give you a good sense of what size crate you will need.

    When puppy comes home - bring a blanket or a soft toy with you to the breeder, rub it all over its litter mates and mom so that there are familiar scents for the first night or so. Have a charged camera battery. Have a way to clean accidents, either an enzymatic cleaner, white vinegar, bleach or some other thing that will clean really, really thoroughly. Have some toys and some chewy things :)

    In the mean time, read up about puppy socialisation (a google will give you lots, but here's a good video):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68wu_HqLXzE
    find a good, positive reinforcement based training school
    scout out a vet that you like

    Be prepared for a bundle of crazy silly laughter to take over everything :D

  3. #3
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    DexterPug is offline Village Puppy
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    I'm a new pug owner myself so can't really give pointers on what to look for. Like Nina said though,I think Dexter chose us, I wanted a boy but when we walked into the house and were surrounded by five little identical balls of energy I think I would have found it hard to pick just one. He happened to waddle over and claw his way up my legs and on to my lap and snuggled up. SOLD !!!.

    The breeder was so informative, we were there for ages, asking questions- I actually think she asked us more questions though. We were shown and talked through a puppy contract-her main concern was that if for any reason we no longer wanted him that we return him to her and not sell him to someone else.

    As for what we needed- everything he needed was provided from the breeder, 2.5kg of kibble, 5 packets of wet food, puppy pads, a lead and collar, a bed, toys and treats and a scent blanket- she also asked if I wanted to leave an item of my clothing with him when we left the deposit, which I did. When we went to take him home she cried saying goodbye to Dexter (who she had been calling Dexter as she asked if we had a name chosen) and we're in touch via e-mail and she sends pics of his brothers and sisters.

    Dexter has a crate and the advice online is they should be able to stand up and turn around in it- its unbelievable how quickly they fill that space.

    We puppy proofed the house before his arrival- took care of any cables he might be able to find his way to etc.

    We have found it to be the most amazing, life changing event for our family and he's slotted into our life perfectly. My only regret is not getting one of his brothers or sisters at the same time.

    I'm on the prowl to extend our pug family.

    Enjoy it, its so exciting.

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  5. #4
    NicolaJ is offline Village Puppy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nina_W View Post
    What should you look for? The one that speaks to you. You've done your research, found a breeder you like... odd are all of them will be wonderful, perfect little puggies. If you're planning on showing, let the breeder guide you, they'll know which ones are show prospects and which are not. It will also help if you go to a few pug shows and know the pug standard. The breeder also typically knows the puppies quite well, if you want a more laid back one they can advise you, likewise with more spunk. All of this, and any first impressions of the puppy, may well change over time as they grow up.

    There are 'puppy tests' that you can do too, if you want to, here's an example:
    Volhard Dog Training and Nutrition: Behavior and Training: Behavior
    I really don't think much of the dominance tests, most contemporary behaviourists also find this to be dubious, but it will help you get some idea of what the pup is like, and how headstrong they are. Also, the advice is a bit dubious also. A puppy with lots of 1s and 2s may be hard to handle, but they may also be just the thing for busy kids, for people with competition/obedience/show aspirations. And ALL dogs can be a bite risk, ALL dogs will need training. The most dangerous dog is a scared, cornered dog. Again, though, one test on one day, with a stranger, tells you very, very little about how the puppy is or will be. Some people swear by these tests, though, so I thought I'd share them :)

    Boys tend to be more laid back, girls have a bit more of a diva attitude. There's an exception for every rule, though. Girls are smaller, potty training can be different if your boy lifts his leg at a young age, and an intact girl will have seasons during which time you will have to keep her safely on lead and under supervision. There's also the thought that boy dogs bond more easily with women, girl dogs with men, but in my personal experience this has not been true.

    What size are the parents? That will give you a good sense of what size crate you will need.

    When puppy comes home - bring a blanket or a soft toy with you to the breeder, rub it all over its litter mates and mom so that there are familiar scents for the first night or so. Have a charged camera battery. Have a way to clean accidents, either an enzymatic cleaner, white vinegar, bleach or some other thing that will clean really, really thoroughly. Have some toys and some chewy things :)

    In the mean time, read up about puppy socialisation (a google will give you lots, but here's a good video):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68wu_HqLXzE
    find a good, positive reinforcement based training school
    scout out a vet that you like

    Be prepared for a bundle of crazy silly laughter to take over everything :D


    Thank you for your advice! I will not be using the pug to show although both parents are show dogs and are exceptional looking pugs, I plan to neuter when I get him as from what research I've done there are a lot more positives in neutering than not neutering.
    My daughter will be three and a half by the time we get our pug and will be in school so I will have a lot of spare time for training etc.
    I previously owned a husky and she was the only dog I've ever owned and such a loving dog unfortunately when I moved out of my parents my mum couldn't bare for me to take her away ( to my dismay) but she still comes to my house for doggy holidays :)
    I am very excited to get my new pug, is there any training advice you could give me and also what length walks would you recommend for a pup?
    Thanks! :) x

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