Biting Puppy
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Thread: Biting Puppy

  1. #1
    LostGirlJess's Avatar
    LostGirlJess is offline Village Puppy
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    Unhappy Biting Puppy

    Hello! I would like some advice, if possible. My little Percy is three months old and is biting very very hard. (I know part of this is because of teething) However, even when we give him toys instead of our hands or clothes, he will still try to bite our hands. My father has begun to swat his bottom with a letter whenever he does this. He has started to bark and growl sometimes when we reach for the paper. Is this causing him to become aggressive? Is there a better way to teach him not to chew on us? Thank you very much.

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    Chewing is instinct for them when they're teething, the only thing that worked for me (or Dexter) was a metal tin with coins in, when he got too excited a quick sharp shake of it made noise and he would stop, it took a few times and lots of praise when he stopped for him to realise.

    He's now 9 months and he's started being a bit chewy again, we got the tin and he stopped as soon as he saw it.

    Yelping for us just excited him and he thought it was a game, we never even considered any kind of swatting or physical contact.

    It's clear that the paper isn't having the desired effect and coming here for advise is a good thing- I am a new pug mum and have found this forum to be fantastic.

    Good luck! :) :)
    Last edited by DexterPug; 11-05-2014 at 02:56 PM. Reason: cant type!

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    Thank you very much. I'll bring this up with my parents to see if we have anything like that!

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    The biting is completely normal because when puppies play, they use their mouths ;) They don´t mean to hurt you, but those puppy teeth are like pins! I agree with DexterPug, a loud noise will deffinately help.Oh, and NEVER pull your hand away, because to them it makes it into a game and as a rule, they lunge at it again when you do that.We were taught that at puppy class and that was another factor in getting Emma to stop biting our fingers and toes.Also, when you pull away from a biting puppies razor sharp teeth, you can do some nasty damage to your hand ;)
    I tried yelping but it didnt work AT ALL, so we took a tin money box and put a bunch of pennies in it, and when she started biting, we´d shake it and say "NO!" in a loud voice (without yanking your hand away to entice playing) and she hated that.It took a few tries, but she caught on quickly and now all we have to do is say "No!" and she stops right away.
    Pugs tend to be BIG on the biting and the chewing, aparantly it´s a thing lol.We went through it when Emma was 3 months old and now again (she´s 8 and a half months old) because now it´s cold again and we´re all wearing socks, she thinks it´s funny to pull at them which hurts when she pinches a toe! Just be consistant and everything will be fine
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    Land sharks! Oh, goodness, was this frustrating.

    It will pass!

    Here's some good advice, but it didn't happen quickly for us (took more than a month for her to just understand that she's hurting us, and another month before we saw major progress)!
    Forbidding a young puppy from biting altogether may offer immediate and temporary relief, but it is potentially dangerous because your puppy will not learn that his jaws can inflict pain. Consequently, if ever provoked or frightened as an adult, the resultant bite is likely to be painful and cause serious injury.
    ...
    Certainly, puppy play-biting must be controlled, but only in a progressive and systematic manner. The puppy must be taught to inhibit the force of his bites, before puppy biting is forbidden altogether. Once your puppy has developed a soft mouth, there is plenty of time to inhibit the frequency of his now gentler mouthing.

    Teaching your puppy to inhibit the force of his bites is a two-step process: first, teach the pup not to hurt you; and second, teach your pup not to exert any pressure at all when biting. Thus the puppy's biting will become gentle mouthing.

    Teaching your puppy to inhibit the frequency of his mouthing is a two-step process: first, teach your puppy that whereas mouthing is OK, he must stop when requested; and second, teach your pup never to initiate mouthing unless requested.

    No Pain
    It is not necessary to hurt or frighten your pup to teach her that biting hurts. A simple "Ouch!" is sufficient. If your pup acknowledges your "ouch" and stops biting, praise her, lure her to sit (to reaffirm that you are in control), reward her with a liver treat, and then resume playing. If your pup ignores the "ouch" and continues biting, yelp "Owwwww!" and leave the room. Your puppy has lost her playmate. Return after a 30-second time-out and make up by lure-rewarding your puppy to come, sit, lie down, and calm down, before resuming play.
    Do not attempt to take hold of your pup’s collar, or carry her to confinement; you are out of control and she will probably bite you again. Consequently, play with your puppy in a room where it is safe to leave her if she does not respond to your yelp. If she ignores you, she loses her playmate.

    No Pressure
    Once your pup's biting no longer hurts, still pretend that it does. Greet harder nips with a yelp of pseudo-pain. Your puppy will soon to get the idea: "Whooahh! These humans are soooo super-sensitive. I'll have to be much gentler when I bite them." The pressure of your puppy's bites will progressively decrease until play-biting becomes play-mouthing.
    Never allow your puppy to mouth human hair or clothing. Hair and clothing cannot feel. Allowing a puppy to mouth hair, scarves, shoelaces, trouser legs, or gloved hands, inadvertently trains the puppy to bite harder, extremely close to human flesh!

    Off!
    Once your pup exerts no pressure whatsoever when mouthing, then —and only then—teach him to reduce the frequency of his mouthing. Teach your puppy the meaning of "Off!" by handfeeding kibble (see the SIRIUS® Puppy Training video). Your puppy will learn that gentle mouthing is OK, but he must stop the instant you ask him to stop.

    Puppy Must Never Initiate Mouthing
    At this stage, your puppy should never be allowed to initiate mouthing (unless requested to do so). Please refer to our Preventing Aggression booklet for a detailed description of the essential rules for bite-inhibition exercises such as handfeeding, play-fighting, and tug-of-war.

    By way of encouragement, mouthing-maniac puppies usually develop gentle jaws as adults because their many painful puppy bites elicited ample appropriate feedback. On the other hand, puppies that seldom play and roughhouse with other dogs, puppies that seldom bite their owners (e.g., shy, fearful, and standoffish pups), and breeds that have been bred to have soft mouths may not receive sufficient feedback regarding the pain and power of their jaws. This is the major reason to enroll your puppy in an off-leash puppy class right away.
    From: https://www.siriuspup.com/behavior-p...s/puppy-biting

    Good luck! Remember, it DOES pass!
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    Edit: I see now they say: "see the video on teaching "off" ... extremely useful. Sigh. What they basically do is put a kibble in your hand, and wait for the puppy to stop mouthing/pawing at your hand. Once the puppy is calm, say "off" and feed the kibble. Repeat, repeat, repeat until you can say "off" and your puppy becomes calm. Then reward, and again, repeat, repeat, repeat until it sticks forever :)
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    So we tried the coins in a can thing, but he's already not listening to it anymore. Is there anything we can do? He's still biting quite a lot, and very painfully. And my family and I are getting upset. He's also beginning to whine a whole lot more, and barking too! Is there anything we can do to maybe get him to stop?

  9. #8
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    Sounds like he has an excess of energy and doesn't know what to do with it. Try adding in some extra exercise...its very helpful in draining energy. Brain exercise is equally important so puppy classes or training sessions and mental games will tucker him out too.

    Don't use physical punishment since it will just encourage him to defend himself physically and you don't want to end up with a fear-biter. As long as he isn't using the play-biting to relieve stress, he should outgrow it with the usual methods of saying ouch and withdrawing yourself from play. It just takes a while.......and then they suddenly get it.
    babyroni likes this.

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    roxieyap is offline New to the Village
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    At three months, puppies are still trainable. You should stop puppy biting at an early age so that your dog knows that he is playing rough and that it is unacceptable behavior
    Last edited by roxieyap; 07-29-2015 at 08:18 PM.

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