Health Testing
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 5 of 5
Like Tree4Likes
  • 2 Post By LilyFayre
  • 2 Post By shaynapug

Thread: Health Testing

  1. #1
    TraceyPead's Avatar
    TraceyPead is offline Village Puppy
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    16

    Default Health Testing

    Good afternoon all,

    I am after some advice for the health testing side of a pugs life.

    I wanted to get little Patrick health tested to make he is all okay and for potential breeding in the future.

    Ideally from the breeding side of things if he is not going to pass on good health to his pups i would get him fixed, as you all probably know this is recommended at 6 months, I have read that the health testing can be done from 12 months plus....

    So my question really is can the vets perform and DNA Test/Health Test of some sort that will show any signs earlier then 12 months old?

    I didnt want to wait to long after the 6 month mark to have his done if that is the option i have to follow.

    I would love for him to have a litter and become a dad but only if he is of a good pool :) he is curently 4 1/2 months so we have some time...

    What are everyone's experiences? have you faced the same thing as me?

    I would love to hear from you.

  2. #2
    GordonBrunoPugMom's Avatar
    GordonBrunoPugMom is offline Village Royalty
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Location
    Ft.Knox Ky
    Posts
    6,553

    Default

    DNA is not changing by age. So there should be no wait to do any DNA tests.
    Not everything will be tested , look at my Gordon he ended up with Ulcerative eosinophilic stomatitis a genetic condition in other Breeds not happening in pugs at all.
    I donít think it makes a difference for a male dog if he is a father or not. Itís humans thinking .
    I leave breeding to expert Breeders.
    As to neuter there are many opinions on to do , not to do and when todo it. I personally have neutered my guys but later not at 6 month. I see how they develop and mature and make a decision on the individual dog. I used to have Dachshunds and not all were neutered.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    LilyFayre's Avatar
    LilyFayre is offline Village Tea Pug
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Hertfordshire, UK
    Posts
    9,618

    Default

    Hi

    Some of the tests are on DNA, although if both of his parents were screened and negative for example for PDE n/n he will be clear. Which doesnít mean that he couldnít ever get it, just that heís at a much lower risk of it. Degenerative myelopathy and Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency would be the other two main tests. I think most people use either Laboklin or UC Davis laboratories in the States to carry out these tests.

    Hemavertabrae is more complicated though as this can still turn up in puppies even though neither parent showed any signs of it on their x-rays, but you obviously wouldnít want to increase the risk of it being passed on if he had it. Some also have a physical examination and an x-ray for luxating patella and hip dysplasia before breeding. As you are already aware the dog needs to have matured to adult size before testing.

    As for neutering, thatís very much down to your own decision and preferences. As I have a 15 month old Male Iíve been researching recently published papers regarding the potential benefits. The only thing I could definitely say is all risk of testicular cancer is removed, but there appears to be increasing evidence that the risk of a few other cancers developing are slightly elevated. This includes Mast cell tumours which pugs tend to be somewhat prone to anyway, and cruciate ligament problems. Some vets still seem to believe that testosterone is linked to prostrate cancer. It is in humans, but apparently not in dogs. So personally, Iím not at all convinced that there is a health benefit to neutering males - itís not that difficult to keep a check on their testicles and if anything untoward did develop it could be quickly dealt with by castration at that point.

    The other reason given is that unless you neuter heíll constantly pee up everything indoors, keep escaping to run off after a bitch in season, or be aggressive. I suppose for owners unable to train their dogs then neutering is the better option, but you donít fall in that category at all! Research also seems to indicate that neutering a fear aggression dog makes them far more aggressive too.

    So - basically itís down to you and what you want. My take on it is as long as Darwinís testicles donít cause him or me any grief, he gets to keep them! In the past I had a bearded collie stud dog living in my home no problems at all, other than his weeing up the bins outside was a bit stinky and needed regularly washing down. He was a very laid back dog though, to the extent he wouldnít go near a bitch in season unless I told him that he could. Most stud dogs have a much stronger sex drive than he ever did!
    Last edited by LilyFayre; 07-20-2018 at 09:29 AM.
    shaynapug and Lu Ci and Ri Ki like this.
    Suzie
    Bree, Xanthe and Darwin

  4. Remove Advertisements
    PugVillage.com
    Advertisements

  5. #4
    shaynapug's Avatar
    shaynapug is offline True Village Royalty
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Berkley, MI
    Posts
    38,280

    Default

    Are you showing him???? Even then there are not a lot of requests for breeding!

    If you don't show....or at least own a quality female...the only stud services you will get will be from backyard breeders who don't test.....
    Lu Ci and Ri Ki and LilyFayre like this.
    Diane
    Shayna Pugs
    http://www.midmichiganpugclub.com
    Chairperson of PDCA Rescue Committee

  6. #5
    LilyFayre's Avatar
    LilyFayre is offline Village Tea Pug
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Hertfordshire, UK
    Posts
    9,618

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shaynapug View Post
    Are you showing him???? Even then there are not a lot of requests for breeding!

    If you don't show....or at least own a quality female...the only stud services you will get will be from backyard breeders who don't test.....
    Sadly what Diane is saying here is as true for the U.K. as it is in the States.

    Whilst the situation of unsold puppies and unwanted adults isn’t quite as desperate with pugs yet as it is for the French bulldog in the U.K. that might also be another thing for you to consider. You would also need to think carefully as to whether or not you would allow the owner of a Pug bitch of an Kennel Club unrecognised colour (or with unrecognised colours in her pedigree) to use your dog for stud. As much as these people protest that their white, chincilla, platinum, panda, pink pugs are pure bred, in my opinion they all originate from cross breeding to introduce these colours or long coats further back in their pedigrees
    Suzie
    Bree, Xanthe and Darwin

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts