Do you pick your pug up by his back fat?
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Thread: Do you pick your pug up by his back fat?

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    Default Do you pick your pug up by his back fat?

    I was talking with a pug owner at a dog park about the roll of fat on the back of most pugs. He said that you can pick the pug up by that roll and they actually like it because of some endorphines. I have no clue how this can work. Even with a smaller pug dog, wouldn't this be a painful maneuver? Have any of you heard this or do it regularly?

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    SallyAndTilly's Avatar
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    Maybe that guy should be picked up that way and see if he likes it?







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    Anyone who tries to pick me up by my roll of fat is gonna get a knuckle sandwich. And Penny has my permission to bite anyone who tries to pick her up that way. I don't think so.

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    I agree with Sally.
    That sounds horrible and I certainly couldn't imagine a puggie liking it.
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    I've never heard anything about that releasing endorphines but it certainly doesn't hurt them to lift them by the scruff of their neck (I assume that's what the guy was talking about). After all, that's how their moms carry them.
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    My thoughts on this ...and I hope I don't make anyone mad..it's only my opinion...

    I was told by a trainer that when I wanted to teach "out" to Rage, that I should pull up on the scruff of his neck because it "reminded" him of his mother and had something to do with relaxing his jaw muscles... it worked.. however...everytime my hand came near him after that, he ducked

    With a puppy...if you are lucky enough not to hurt pup, you definitely will scare pup. You will teach the pup that sometimes, when your hand(s) reach out, you are going to be the cause of pain and fear.

    For some people the justification for this scruff thing is that it supposedly is imitating what the mother dog naturally does....I don't think that is necessarily true ...the mother does not pick the puppy 3 or 4 or 5 or 6 feet off the ground.....plus, as humans, we not as efficient or as effective as the mother dog.

    The mother dog has control of her mouth ....She has the body language that puppies understand ...humans do not speak the language well and our timing is never as good as the mother dog.

    If that's what he wants to do, why not lick the pups as the mother dog does? Just remember the mother dog licks to stimulate bladder and bowel movements...hee hee -

    I don't see any good reason for it...you are endangering pup’s trust in you...and there is a good chance that pup might become somewhat hand shy and maybe some damage if ya don't know your own strength ...
    Last edited by krbeckett; 02-20-2006 at 04:34 PM.

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    That is how their mom's carry them when they are babies, not when they are full grown ... sounds like it would be painful to me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ownedbymack
    That is how their mom's carry them when they are babies, not when they are full grown ... sounds like it would be painful to me.
    Good point, Sabra. Don't want anyone to get me wrong, I don't do this with either of mine (I think at 23 and 25 pounds, they're heavy enough when I pick them up with both hands!).
    Rachel - mom to Diesel, Makayla and Gracie Lou Freebush

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    FourteenLegs is offline Village Diva
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    The weight of the dog against the amount of skin could cause damage. Connecting tissue could easily rip. Not a good idea. I have heard the theory about holding the scruff of the neck, but when so much is done to promote positive reinforcement, I think that sounds too much like negative reinforcement. I can understand where it is coming from, but I am not convinced...... When you see dogs and cats carry their babies, it is not always by the scruff, it is more like they have their jaws AROUND the body, not just grasping a bit of skin - in most cases.

    The theory about the release of endorphins does have some basis in fact (but I am NOT applying this to the dog issue!). With horses, when we need to do something (clip, inject, shoe, dental......) to which they object strongly, we use a "twitch". This is a thin piece of twine that is attached to something solid (a piece of wood like a hammer or ax handle is often used) but can be a plastic pipe or various other things. The twine is placed around the horse's top lip and twisted - tight. The result is quite amazing. The horses stop fighting instantly and totally relax - their eyes glaze over and their bodies just droop. It is like they are drugged. It is something that is always (for me, anyway) used as a last resort in handling horses, but in a contest of strength with a recalcitrant horse, there is only going to be one winner, and they're not on two legs. The result here is following the endorphin theory, and if that's what it is, then great! Whatever works!! (For HORSES!!! not dogs!!)



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    No, please don't pick a dog up by the scruff---among other reasons, it allows no normal support for the belly and with no comfort in the restraint the dog will fight then and fight the next time you try it.

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