Rocky and Doodoo just fought, Doodoo bleed.
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Thread: Rocky and Doodoo just fought, Doodoo bleed.

  1. #1
    Korittto is offline Village Puppy
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    Default Rocky and Doodoo just fought, Doodoo bleed.

    Breaking news: I was just playing tug o war with both Rocky and Doodoo (3 yrs old, female, both sisters) and all of a sudden Rocky goes into this jealous rage (?) and TACKLES Doodoo to the ground and goes at her with her mouth and claws and now Doodoo's tongue is bleeding a little bit. I'm so mad at Rocky for doing that, I put her in her cage to let her settle down but does anybody else have experience with their pugs fighting like this? Rocky has had a history of growling and lightly fighting with Doo but it's never been this serious before. Rocky became a hellhound for a quick 15 seconds and it scared me how she would do something like this. It's also really strange because Rocky is usually the one that licks Doodoo all over her face and ears pretty much continuously every day to show her sisterly affection so I'm starting to think that Rocky is a bit bi-polar when it comes to her sister.
    Last edited by Korittto; 04-22-2015 at 10:54 PM.

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    Korittto is offline Village Puppy
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    Just found out her ear is bleeding too :(

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    shaynapug is offline True Village Royalty
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    They say that puncture wounds are the worst....so you want to get meds on it and maybe get to the vet......

    As for the fighting......I really cannot help you. You have to figure out what things cause problems....playing with you??? food???? etc!
    Diane
    Shayna Pugs
    http://www.midmichiganpugclub.com
    Chairperson of PDCA Rescue Committee

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    Yes, meds and the vet might be best. Hope she's OK and things settle down. It's scary when they fight! But being mad at them doesn't help; especially in such a high-stakes situation as tug-o-war. It's a high-tension game that encourages aggression. Add a human in the mix, that makes it a high-value game -- too enticing to share, especially if one dog has a history of dominating the other.

    I'd stop the tug-o-war games, and make sure everyone's healthy (sometimes aggression comes from illness or injury) with a vet checkup to make sure there's no physical problem. Separate them for feeding (always is best; it's such a high-stakes situation) and I'd take up toys, etc. for awhile so no trigger objects are available. Make sure they have lots of exercise and try feeding (separately) with a treat ball to encourage active, nonaggressive play.

    (
    Rocky has had a history of growling and lightly fighting with Doo
    is a concern, as that can escalate into something ugly, as you've seen. I'm trying to calm a similar (more posturing, but not acceptable) problem in my own four-pug grumble, as the up-and-coming young whippersnapper (Wooster) is being obnoxious to the elders.

    Focus and diversion training are helping. Recently, one of our training aces, Nina, posted some detailed instructions on techniques that are so good and relevant here I am copying and pasting them here for you (Thanks, Nina!):
    Here, you will gradually expose each dog individually to the stimulus that triggered over excitement (something behind the window that they want to bark at) and you'll change their association from "er mer gerd! Bark bark bark!" to something else. The secret is, you'll come with a plan. First, you must decide what you'd rather have the dog do than bark and get all wound up. Perhaps you'd prefer them to lie down calmly? Maybe you want them to come to you? Go to their crate for a bit? Or maybe just stare lovingly into your eyes? Any of these are good choices. First, you must practice whatever you choose away from the stimulus. Work with one dog at a time, training more than one at a time is impossible if you're learning new things. I can help you figure out how to teach whatever behaviour you'd like to teach. Usually treats and patience gets you there with a pug. You practice this new skill until it is perfect.

    Then, you take your dog near where they would start barking, but not quite yet at the point where they bark. So, maybe at the door to the window-room, where they become alert that there is something going on outside, but don't lose their heads just yet. When their ears prick up (or they show interest in the outside) ask them to do their new behaviour in stead of running in and barking. Reward very well when they do it. Do a few repetitions, and call it a day. When they're perfect at that starting point - in other words, when they easily ignore the stimulus and do what you'd rather they do, you move a little bit closer. Take it slowly, if you go too fast they'll just start barking and you'll have to take a step back. Each time, try and move closer, but only to that point where they show interest, but can still think.
    Over time, what will happen is the stimulus will trigger your new, chosen behaviour, in stead of "bark your head off". And magic, quiet, calm dogs even when trucks come past, hooting.

    Once they are both good at it, individually, get on doing them both together :) You might need to take a few steps back at first, since dogs wind each other up, but yeah, you'll get there.

    It goes faster than you might think, usually they catch on quickly. The long bit is keeping up the reward for long enough that the behaviour sticks permanently. Expect to keep rewarding them for a long time.

    Other things you can do is to generally expose your dogs to sights and sounds in a friendly, positive way. Take them near a building yard, for example. Don't go too close, you definitely do not want to frighten them, just take them to where they can hear and see and smell the noise and the movement and the chaos, and feed them a couple treats. Funny noises=good things is what you'd like. Again, this works best if you work at one at a time.

    The same thing can help with children, other dogs, and each other. But always keep training times short (one or two minutes at a time is enough usually), progress gradually, and reward really well.

    Another thing worth doing for all dogs in general is the relaxation protocol. If you've ever wished your dog has an off switch, here's the way to install one:
    http://www.dogdaysnw.com/doc/Protoco...en_Overall.pdf
    and the same pdf just in audio files:
    https://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&rc...91427555,d.ZGU
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    Hope she's okay.
    Jackie,Mom to Robbie & Stacy my human children and Tinker my furkid.

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    Korittto is offline Village Puppy
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    Thank you for the great response. Yes, I realize now I've been doing this wrong as I have a dual bowl which can feed two dogs at the same time. I will begin feeding them seperately immediately. I've been trying to do everything with them together at the same time because I felt as though I should treat them equally so none feels lacking of attention over the other.
    Lu Ci and Ri Ki and Loconn55 like this.

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